Five Questions With... Annabelle Attanasio (MICKEY AND THE BEAR)

Teenager Mickey, forced to take on adult responsibilities as her veteran father struggles with addiction, must ultimately choose between familial obligation and personal fulfillment, in MICKEY AND THE BEAR by writer/director Annabelle Attanasio.

Read more with Annabelle below, and see the film TODAY (Sat 6/22) at 11:45am and tomorrow (Sun 6/23) at 9pm!

Young Film Lovers between the ages of 18-30 can enjoy $10 tickets with code NFFYFL30 online or at the door!

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NFF: Can you talk a little about your inspiration for the film?

ANNABELLE: There are so many father-son stories, but only a handful of father-daughter stories where the daughter is more than a vehicle for her father’s emotions. I am so grateful that recent films like EIGHTH GRADE and LEAVE NO TRACE exist, and I hope MICKEY AND THE BEAR falls into the expanding canon of films that explore the complexity of the father-daughter bond.

My film contributes something somewhat darker, somewhat outré to that canon. What happens when you are 17, your mother’s dead, and your Dad is single, unstable, and self-medicating with booze and pills? Mickey alternates between traditional feminine roles — daughter, wife and mother — in order to keep her father’s mercurial moods and addictions at bay. Sometimes she nurtures him like she’s his mom. Sometimes she makes him feel important like she’s his little girl. And sometimes, she inadvertently lets her father cross a boundary so he can fill the void of his late wife.

Since writing the script I have met so many girls and women who have gone through some version of this pattern. I hope Mickey feels like a mosaic of all those girls and women who went through varying degrees of the same experience.

NFF: How old was your lead actress (Camila) when you started filming? Did you adjust your directing technique at all when working with younger actors vs. the adults in the film?

ANNABELLE: Cami has just turned 21 when we started filming. She continues to awe me with her artistic maturity, professionalism, and wisdom beyond her years. She feels like an old pro of her craft. What was fun about working with a group of such unique actors was learning each persons process. Badge is a veteran of film and television but this role was quite different from anything he had done before, so that was really exciting for me — to build the role with such an experienced actor. Ben came up doing a lot of theatre and loves immersing himself in the daily rituals of the real life people he’s representing, and I loved how singular he was able to make his role based on his research. With Calvin, he embodied the essence of the character so viscerally that I decided to cast him and tailor the character to fit him. We spoke extensively before the shoot coming up with Wyatt’s backstory, though in the movie you learn very little about him. I found age somewhat irrelevant — I think each actor is special in their own way and it is the director’s job to learn how to best support and guide them through the shoot.

NFF: You have a background as an actor. Did you always want to make films as a writer/director? What did you learn as an actor that was helpful on the other side of the camera?

ANNABELLE: If you’ve acted professionally and been through the slog of fairly consistent rejection, you just have so much more empathy for your actors. There is nothing worse than feeling like your director is working against you, or having bad communication with him or her. Mickey was an opportunity to really invest in my actor relationships. To make sure I listened and stayed present and was clear in my direction.

NFF: What are you working on currently, and/or where can we see more of your work?

ANNABELLE: I have two new features in development right now. MICKEY comes out in the Fall. My first short is called FRANKIE KEEPS TALKING and it’s available on Vimeo and my latest short, SAFE SPACE, will be online soon too. 

Five Questions With... Michael Tyburski (THE SOUND OF SILENCE)

In Spotlight Film THE SOUND OF SILENCE, a successful "house tuner," who calibrates the sound in people's homes in order to adjust their moods, meets a client with a problem he can't solve. Featuring Peter Sarsgaard, Rashida Jones, and Austin Pendleton.

Read more about the film with writer/director Michael Tyburski, and see it on Sat, June 22 at 11:30am and Sun, June 23 at 12:15pm!

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NFF: Can you talk a little about your inspiration for both the script and the visual/aural palette of the film?

MICHAEL: Well, it started with a short film that I made called PALIMPSEST, which I wrote with my friend Ben Nabors. And I think after making the short, we both realized that we wanted to do more with the “house tuner” character, who is introduced in that film. He’s the perfect conduit in which to tell a larger story about sound and the way it influences people. The feature script was really inspired by our collective experiences living in a noisy city. Aurally, I wanted sound to be represented as an ever present, but invisible character on screen too. We used a lot of static frames in the film, and my cinematographer and I played with negative space so that we could leave physical room for this unseen presence that is mostly portrayed sonically. As far as the visual palette, it’s a modern set film, but told from the point-of-view of a character who operates in a slightly dated New York, aesthetically. So we had that spirit in mind while shooting. I suppose I wanted to try my hand at making my own version of a love letter to New York City too. It’s such an inherently cinematic setting, and I have a lot of romantic feelings about the city.

NFF: Did making the film heighten your own sense of sound in your home (and everywhere else)?

MICHAEL: Very much so, yes. I did a lot of research into sound science and noise leading up to production. I’m typically hyper aware of the sounds around me, but making this film certainly escalated my sensitivity. I don’t think it was a conscious decision at the time, but when we were in post-production, I actually moved homes within New York City for the first time in a decade of living here. I moved from an apartment on a pretty busy commercial street, to the much quieter block I currently reside on. And like the main character in the film, my personal office is now literally located in a subterranean room in my home, away from the noise on the ground level. I love silence and appreciate having as much control as I can over the sounds that come into my space.

NFF: How did the collaboration work between your sound mixer, composer, and editor?

MICHAEL: It was designed to work very in-tandem in our case. And it’s an interesting question, because more often on an independent film budget, it’s unfortunately typical for these departments to work separately from one another. But it was really important for me from the beginning to make sure there was a dialogue between everybody. Because sound itself is really its own character in the story, it was necessary to be actively thinking about that unseen element while we were editing picture. Our sound team came into the edit to review early cuts, and even created temp sounds for us so we could use them prior to getting into the actual sound mix. Once we were mixing, our designers were working in parallel with our composer too. I personally think sound design and score are at their best when they can become one and the same.

NFF: What are you working on currently, and/or where can we see more of your work?

MICHAEL: I’m spending a lot of time writing these days. I’ve been dreaming of doing something that takes place in the past, so I’ve been doing a bit of time traveling to long gone eras as of late. As far as where you can see more of my work, a lot of my short films are easily tracked down and available to screen on the old world wide web.

NFF: Why are you excited to screen in Nantucket, and/or what do you hope Nantucket audiences might relate to or takeaway from the film?

MICHAEL: I'm excited to screen as much as I can while I’m on the island. Presenting work to a live audience in a movie theater is one of my favorite things. So I’m really just looking forward to the opportunity to share a good story that hopefully resonates.

Five Questions With... Tyler Nilson & Michael Schwartz (THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON)

In Spotlight Film THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON, Zak runs away from his care home and teams with fugitive Tyler to go on the adventure of a lifetime. Featuring Shia LaBeouf, Dakota Johnson, Zack Gottsagen, John Hawkes, Bruce Dern, and Thomas Haden Church.

We spoke to writers/directors Tyler Nilson & Michael Schwartz. Read more with them below, and see the film on Sat, June 22 at 7:30pm and Sun, June 23 at 2:45pm!

Note: Young Film Lovers between the ages of 18-30 can see this film for just $10 with code NFFYFL30 online or at the box office!

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NFF: Can you talk a little bit about your inspiration for the film?

TYLER & MICHAEL: We wrote THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON  after a heartfelt conversation with our friend Zack.  He’s a born entertainer and had been studying acting and dance most of his life when he told us that he wanted to be a movie star.  We replied honestly that there weren’t a lot of opportunities or roles written for people with Down syndrome to star in movies and he asked, “Then why don’t you write one for me?”  

NFF: What was the casting process like, and where did you find Zack? When did you know he would be your star?

TYLER & MICHAEL: The role was written specifically for Zack, we spent a lot of time together talking about life, movies, adventure, and what he likes and doesn’t like.  A lot of the dialogue in the movie are things that he’d said to us in conversation.

Our biggest challenge wasn’t casting Zack it was keeping him in the role.  Before we landed with producers that "got it" at Bona Fide and Armory we had offers to finance the movie but only if we’d cast a known actor without a disability playing disabled.  

The rest of the cast that filled out with perfect fits.  I’m so proud of the performances given by Shia LaBeouf, Dakota Johnson, Bruce Dern, John Hawkes, Thomas Haden Church, and Jon Bernthal.  Legendary wrestlers Jake “The Snake” Roberts and Mick Foley were amazing to have on set and they added depth and authenticity as well.

NFF: There's both a "buddy comedy" and "road trip" vibe to the film, although this is a uniquely original take...were you inspired by other films in those genres?

TYLER & MICHAEL: There’s a lot of movies that we love and every day we break down films and talk about what types of elements work well to make audiences feel certain ways, connect to characters, and trigger emotions.  Tonally we were influenced by HUCK FINN, STAND BY ME, MUD, etc.

NFF: What are you working on currently, and/or where can we see more of your work?

TYLER & MICHAEL: First and foremost we’re staying as present as possible with THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON.  We want to support the movie every way we can so audiences go see the work our whole team put from producers, to actors, and crew. 

Beyond that we have a TV show that we’re developing with LuckyChap based on our experience living in an illegal tree house surrounded by raccoons and mountain lions in Los Angeles (Money was tight right before we left to shoot THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON) and a feature that we’re keeping under the radar for the time being.

NFF: Why are you excited to screen in Nantucket, and/or what do you hope Nantucket audiences might relate to or takeaway from the film?

TYLER & MICHAEL: Everything that we’ve heard about Nantucket has been extremely positive.  We’ve always wanted to go to the island and the reputation of the festival is that a lot of the focus is on writing which is such an important part of the process and often overlooked. 


With any movie the goal is for the audience to connect, feel something, maybe identify with a character, and have an authentic experience.  When we premiered at SXSW the reactions exceeded expectations and the film took home the audience award.  In Nantucket we hope the audience is taken in by the mix of hope, heart, and drama as well in a way that might make their day, week, or life just a little bit better.



Five Questions With... Sameh Zoabi (TEL AVIV ON FIRE)

In this irreverent satire, a middle-aged slacker fails upwards in his job on the set of a popular Palestinian soap opera only to end up fielding script notes from a disgruntled Israeli military officer. Winner: 2016 NFF Showtime Tony Cox Feature Screenplay Competition.

We spoke to Writer/Director Sameh Zoabi about TEL AVIV ON FIRE. Read more below, and see it on Thurs, June 20 at 6:00pm and Sun, June 23 at 5:30pm!

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NFF: Can you talk a little bit about your inspiration for the screenplay?

SAMEH: I was inspired by the reaction to my work both films and scripts - as a Palestinian filmmaker who also hold an Israeli citizenship I feel that people always read closely  into the politics of my work, there is always an interpretation that swings between the two sides.  People question both the Israeli side of the story and the Palestinian, it always feels like it is a test and I have to pass both sides somehow to survive as a filmmaker.  It’s an interesting dilemma that I find myself trapped with each time I want to make a movie… this feeling was the beginning of inspiration of TEL AVIV ON FIRE. Salam, the main character,  is a Palestinian young man that works on finding his voice as a writer on a soap opera, he is trapped between the Israeli Officers at the checkpoint and the Arab producers. He tries to please each one by giving them an end to the show that both agree with. This is for me the core of the  film, and the tone of using comedy was inspired by upbringing—humor is an essential mechanism for my people to deal with the harsh daily reality of experiencing injustice. 

NFF: You're returning to Nantucket, having been a previous Tony Cox Screenplay winner. How has the script changed since then, and/or how was that process helpful to you?

SAMEH: The Tony Cox screenplay award and then later the same year I stayed at the writer’s colony, all of this in fact lead me to the draft in which I was able to raise funding for the film.  Our first funding came a few months after the colony and working with advisors on the script.  However, given the nature of co-production with Europe, we had to go through a set of many rewrites before shooting, as the script was translated into different languages and cultures news ideas were born as a result until almost a week before shooting.  At a certain moment the script and the process started to feel similar to the film’s central dilemma-- in a good way.

NFF: Did you grow up watching soaps? How did you decide on that genre as your entry point?

SAMEH: Soap operas are a big deal in the Middle East. People watch them and are fully taken by them as well. What I find interesting is that the people who watch soaps find the acting and straightforward dialogue more realistic than the subtle acting and dialogue of feature films. The soap opera medium allowed me to explore things that I may never be able to do otherwise in cinema. For instance, the opening scene of the film, which I find quite political. The characters say very direct things, without filters, but because this scene takes place inside the movie as part of a soap opera, it provides comic relief.

When I was growing up inside Israel, disconnected from the Arab world, there were only two TV channels. The Arabic-language shows were mostly from Egypt. They had the best soap opera series, particularly in the month of Ramadan. The show I created in my film is an homage to one famous show I grew up with. Nowadays, the reality has changed. There are hundreds of Arab TV channels and many shows from Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, and even dubbed ones from Turkey and India. Recently, I was watching a soap with my mom. I was laughing at an emotional moment because of its over-dramatized acting and camera work, but my mom was holding a tissue, crying. This experience inspired me when writing and directing the film.  

 NFF: What are you working on currently, and/or where can we see more of your work?

SAMEH: Since I am based in the US for some time now, I feel after TEL AVIV ON FIRE I am ready for a new adventure to make a film in the US. I am in the process of developing a feature and a TV show. That said, I will still be working on films in the Middle East. I am in the process of financing a comedy set in Gaza called CATCH THE MOON.  Rebecca O’Brien from Sixteen Films in the UK is the lead producer working with my partners on TEL AVIV ON FIRE.   My previous work should be available on streaming services, except for my first feature MAN WITHOUT A CELL PHONE (2010), which we hope to have available soon.

NFF: Why are you excited to screen in Nantucket, and/or what do you hope Nantucket audiences might relate to or takeaway from the film?

SAMEH: I am indeed excited, it is a special intimate festival with a great audience that I feel will connect with my film. So far the film has been screening in many festivals around the word, winning many audience awards thus far; it is a great feeling in general to know that the audience enjoys the film. After all we make films to share with people.  So for me, coming back to Nantucket after being there with a script before is super special. Believing in an idea that now is reality on the big screen.  The film presents a political discussion over the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in a comedic tone, so I hope that the audience will both laugh (enjoy) but also reflect on the issues discussed in the film. Looking forward to it! 

#NFF2019 Showtime's Tony Cox Feature Screenplay & Episodic Screenplay (60 Min) FINALISTS Announced!

Read more below about the finalists’ scripts and the prizes up for grabs!

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Feature Screenplay Finalists:

10 by Charles Forbes  
The life story of famed, gay author, Tennessee Williams.

GREENWOOD by Nathan Patton
Buck Franklin is an African American lawyer in 1920s Oklahoma, struggling to find work and provide for his family. When he hears of an all black community in Greenwood, he decides to visit the town and explore his opportunities. Shortly after his arrival, an incident involving a young black man and white woman sparks a race riot and the destruction of the black community, and Buck sets out to bring justice to the people of Greenwood.

SUNDOGS by Elizabeth Chatelain 
When Alex's father dies and their family farm slips into debilitating debt, she takes her 12-year-old daughter Jenny West with her to work on the North Dakota oilfields. But after the oil industry's decline begins and Alex loses her job, she must decide which is more important: the farm, or her fragile relationship with her daughter.

Finalists Receive:

  • VIP week-­long Pass to Nantucket Film Festival;

  • Attend Showtime ­sponsored reception during the Film Festival;

  • Participation in Mentors Brunch with prominent screenwriter during the Film Festival;

  • Name inclusion on Festival catalogue and website as Competition winner;

  • Print and media coverage.

And One Winner, to be announced during the Festival, will receive:

  • $5,000 cash prize from the Nantucket Film Festival;

  • All expenses paid, month­-long stay at exclusive Screenwriters Colony on Nantucket in October;

  • VIP week-­long Pass to Nantucket Film Festival;

  • Round­ trip from New York to Nantucket to attend Film Festival;

  • Accommodations in Nantucket during the Film Festival;

  • A Showtime­ sponsored reception during the Film Festival in the winner’s honor;

  • Participation in Mentors Brunch with prominent screenwriter during the Film Festival;

  • Name inclusion on Festival catalogue and website as Competition winner;

  • Print and media coverage.

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Episodic 60 Minute Pilot Screenplay Finalists:

BACK-ALLEY by Young Eun (Grace) Kim 
Ada, a disgraced former surgeon, decides to team up with a motley medical devices engineer and become the Robin Hood of medical procedures.

COMPTON, NH by Hyun Chessman
A small, rural town is turned upside down by the sudden appearance of the City of Compton in its backyard.

LIVING by Kate Levitt
Ezra, a seventeen-year-old Jewish James Dean, leads a double life--at home, Orthodox and pious, and at school, drugging and partying.  As he juggles the two worlds, his “pious" family faces their own challenges.  

One Winner Receives:

  • $1,000 cash prize from the Nantucket Film Festival;

  • Private one-on-one consultation with Showtime executive;

  • VIP week-­long Pass to Nantucket Film Festival;

  • Attend Showtime ­sponsored reception during the Film Festival;

  • Participation in Mentors Brunch with prominent screenwriter during the Film Festival;

  • Name inclusion on Festival catalogue and website as Competition winner;

  • Print and media coverage.

#NFF18 Showtime's Tony Cox Feature Screenplay, Episodic Screenplay (60 Min), and Shorts Writer FINALISTS Announced!

Read more below about our finalists, their scripts, and the prizes up for grabs!

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Feature Screenplay Finalists:

CAMBRIDGE by Henry Hayes and Zolan Kanno-Youngs
The life of Boston Bomber, ‎Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, as seen by friends who knew him before the event, and who struggle to rationalize their friend with the killer he became.

THE NOVICE by Lauren Hadaway
An overachieving novice rower becomes obsessed with making the Varsity team, to the point that she starts to lose touch with reality.

QUEENS by Max Sokoloff
Sperm donor, Ben, meets his crossing-dressing middleschooler son for the first time and has to decide if he wants to be a dad. 

Finalists Receive:

  • VIP week-­long Pass to Nantucket Film Festival;

  • Attend Showtime ­sponsored reception during the Film Festival;

  • Participation in Mentors Brunch with prominent screenwriter during the Film Festival;

  • Name inclusion on Festival catalogue and website as Competition winner;

  • Print and media coverage.

And One Winner, to be announced during the Festival, will receive:

  • $5,000 cash prize from the Nantucket Film Festival;

  • All expenses paid, month­-long stay at exclusive Screenwriters Colony on Nantucket in October;

  • VIP week-­long Pass to Nantucket Film Festival;

  • Round­ trip from New York to Nantucket to attend Film Festival;

  • Accommodations in Nantucket during the Film Festival;

  • A Showtime­ sponsored reception during the Film Festival in the winner’s honor;

  • Participation in Mentors Brunch with prominent screenwriter during the Film Festival;

  • Name inclusion on Festival catalogue and website as Competition winner;

  • Print and media coverage.

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Episodic 60 Min Pilot Screenplay Finalists:

BETWEEN THE EYES by G.J. Lee
America's first female detective is hired by Abraham Lincoln to ensure his safety in traveling to Washington, DC for his inauguration.  

DETESTABLE by Brandon Morrissey
The closeted son of a pastor arrives to a Christian university where his understanding of the world is challenged by his peers.

LEGACY by Kellen Hertz
An elite Connecticut University finds a doll reenactment of a heinous crime (which was committed 20 years ago) at the original site, The Founders Tomb, and it seems an important legacy student is  somehow connected with the current crime.

One Winner Receives:

  • $1,000 cash prize from the Nantucket Film Festival;

  • Private one-on-one consultation with Showtime executive;

  • VIP week-­long Pass to Nantucket Film Festival;

  • Attend Showtime ­sponsored reception during the Film Festival;

  • Participation in Mentors Brunch with prominent screenwriter during the Film Festival;

  • Name inclusion on Festival catalogue and website as Competition winner;

  • Print and media coverage.

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Short Screenplay Finalists:

ASSISTS, GOALS, SAVES by Kelly Pike
Rising field hockey star Emmie starts to change after a visit to the team doctor.

CINDERELLA WAR by Margaret Kane-Rowe
A quaint family in Ireland receives a hostile visit from the Irish Republican Army. 

THE INVISIBLE MONSTER by Gordon LePage
A boy at the beach, playing pretend from his favorite TV show, finds a monster.
 

One Winner Receives:

  • $500 cash prize from the Nantucket Film Festival;

  • VIP week-­long Pass to Nantucket Film Festival;

  • Attend Showtime ­sponsored reception during the Film Festival;

  • Participation in Mentors Brunch with prominent screenwriter during the Film Festival;

  • Name inclusion on Festival catalogue and website as Competition winner;

  • Print and media coverage.

Showtime's Tony Cox Feature Screenplay Finalists Announced!

Congratulations to our three finalists in Showtime's Tony Cox Feature Screenplay Competition:

Corporate Retreat, by Marty Johnson. Eliza, a single mom and would-be actress making ends meet as a property manager for second homeowners, takes on the role of a lifetime: one of her wealthy clients.

Johnny Ace, by Moon Molson. Christmas, 1954: Houston homicide detectives investigating the seemingly accidental death of popular R&B singer Johnny Ace discover that the case is far more complex than it first appears.

Lifers, by Amanda Peppe with Chris Peppe. An ex-con gets out of prison after 35 years and seeks redemption, standing up for a family of migrant farmworkers.

From L to R: Marty Johnson, Moon Molson and Amanda Peppe

Finalists Receive:

  • VIP week-­long Pass to Nantucket Film Festival;
  • Attend Showtime ­sponsored reception during the Film Festival;
  • Participation in Mentors Brunch with prominent screenwriter during the Film Festival;
  • Name inclusion on Festival catalogue and website as Competition winner;
  • Print and media coverage.

And One Winner, to be announced during the Festival, will receive:

  • $5,000 cash prize from the Nantucket Film Festival;
  • All expenses paid, month­-long stay at exclusive Screenwriters Colony on Nantucket in October;
  • VIP week-­long Pass to Nantucket Film Festival;
  • Round­ trip from New York to Nantucket to attend Film Festival;
  • Accommodations in Nantucket during the Film Festival;
  • A Showtime­ sponsored reception during the Film Festival in the winner’s honor;
  • Participation in Mentors Brunch with prominent screenwriter during the Film Festival;
  • Custom leather bound copy of the winner’s script, courtesy of Showtime;
  • Name inclusion on Festival catalogue and website as Competition winner;
  • Print and media coverage.

Showtime's Tony Cox Feature Screenplay SemiFinalists Announced!

Congratulations to our writers:

Any Given Week by Jen Richards
A week in the lives of three successful, but very different, transgender women, as they navigate career, love, and friendship.

Corporate Retreat by Marty Johnson
Eliza, a single mom and would-be actress making ends meet as a property manager for second homeowners, takes on the role of a lifetime: one of her wealthy clients.

The Esther Code by Esa Nurminen
An FBI agent must solve a ancient hidden code to stop a serial-killer vigilante.

Germ by Niki Sharirli
Inspired by true events. In the mid 1800s, Ignaz Semmelweis worked against the prejudices of his peers and his own self-doubt to pioneer one of the most important procedures in modern medicine - hand washing.

Henry County by Walker Kalan
While struggling to raise his preteen cousin, a young mechanic in rural Virginia falls for a journalist from New York.

The Interlude by Paul G. O'Connor
An idealistic young American woman running a soup kitchen near the front lines in World War I is confronted with the realities of war by a mysterious Belgian soldier.

Johnny Ace by Moon Molson
Christmas, 1954: Houston homicide detectives investigating the seemingly accidental death of popular R&B singer Johnny Ace discover that the case is far more complex than it first appears.

Lifers by  by Amanda Peppe with Chris Peppe
An ex-con gets out of prison after 35 years and seeks redemption, standing up for a family of migrant farmworkers.

Long Shot by by Tamar Halper with Stephen Wiesmore
A young biracial dancer from a broken home has big dreams that seem completely unattainable until she meets the most unlikely mentor.

Savage Beauty by Charles Lyons
The story of Edna St. Vincent Millay, the ultimate bohemian of 1920s Greenwich Village, and her struggle to find love while burning her candle at both ends.

    Showtime's Tony Cox Feature Screenplay Competition Semi-Finalists

    NFF is pleased to announce the ten semi-finalists of our Showtime Tony Cox Feature Screenplay Competition. These seven are in contention to win the following:  a spot in the month-long October Screenwriters Colony, with complimentary travel, housing, and meals; a $5,000 cash prize; a VIP week­-long Pass to the 2016 Nantucket Film Festival; and a roundtrip NYC/Nantucket flight with accommodations to attend the Festival. 

    Conjugal, by Conway Preston

    Daisy Chain, by Rachel Gerlach

    Flyboy, by TR Lawrence

    House of Horowitz, by Jennifer Meyer

    Motor City, by Matthew Kohnen and Sean Kohnen

    Ninja Girl, by Camille Beaudoin

    Tel Aviv on Fire, by Sameh Zoabi

    The Count, by David Bluestein

    Time Tourists, by Josh Miller

    Undead Outlaws, by Matthew David

    The winner will be announced during the Festival at the Showtime Tony Cox Awards Brunch on Friday, June 24th.